NYSORA LMS

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Courses

1
Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block
Expires After: Does not Expire

Indications: Anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder, upper arm, and clavicle sugeries.

Goal: Local anesthetic spread around superior and middle trunks of the brachial plexus, between the anterior and middle scalene muscles.

Transducer: Linear, high frequency

Needle: 23-22 gauge, 5 cm short bevel

Local anesthetic volume: 7-15 mL

2
Wrist Block
Expires After: Does not Expire

 

Wrist block

 

Indications: Hand and finger surgeries not involving the deep structures of the dorsum of the hand and thumb.

Goal: Injection of local anesthetic within the vicinity of the median, ulnar, and the sensory branch of the radial nerve (if needed).

Transducer: Linear

Needle: 25 gauge needle

Local anesthetic volume: 3-5 mL per nerve

3
Quadratus Lumborum Block
Expires After: Does not Expire

Indications: Analgesia for the anterolateral abdominal wall and parietal peritoneum

Goal: Local anesthetic injection lateral (QL 1), posterior (QL2) or anterior (QL 3) to the quadratus lumborum muscle.

Transducer: Linear or Curved

Needle: 21-22G, 10 cm

Local anesthetic volume: 15-20 mL

4
Fascia Iliaca Block
Expires After: Does not Expire

 

 

Indications: Analgesia for hip fractures and hip surgery

Goal: Local anesthetic spread underneath the fascia iliaca toward the lumbar plexus

Transducer: Linear

Needle: 22G, 5 cm short bevel

Local anesthetic volume: 20-40 mL

5
Femoral Nerve Block
Expires After: Does not Expire

 

 

Indications: Anesthesia and analgesia for hip, femur, anterior thigh, knee and patella procedures; analgesia for hip fracture.

Goal: Local anesthetic spread around the femoral nerve

Transducer: Linear

Needle: 22-23G, 5 cm short bevel

Local anesthetic volume: 10 – 15 mL

6
Regional Anesthesia & Nerve Injury
Expires After: Does not Expire

Organization of the peripheral nerve.

 

Nerve injury following peripheral nerve blockade is a potentially serious complication that can result in permanent disability. Fortunately, many neurologic deficits are reversible and can be handled with reassurance and appropriate follow-up.

Etiology remains unclear in many instances. A combination of needle-nerve mechanical trauma, injection injury, hematoma, and other factors are associated with a range of perioperative processes, patient characteristics, anesthetic technique, and surgical factors.

7
Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity (LAST)
Expires After: Does not Expire

Local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) occurs with an excessive dose, rapid absorption, or accidental intravenous injection. The management can be challenging and may require prolonged resuscitation efforts when cardiac toxicity occurs.

To optimize patient outcome in case of LAST you must:

  1. Understand the circumstances associated with the risk of toxicity
  2. Be prepared, have a plan, and equipment ready for treatment.